Earl Anthony Wayne

Earl Anthony Wayne is currently teaching as a Distinguished Diplomat in Residence at American University's School of International Service.  He is a Public Policy Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars and Co-Chair of the Advisory Board of its Mexico Institute.  Wayne is a former Assistant Secretary of State for Economic and Business Affairs, a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and to Argentina and a former Deputy Ambassador in Afghanistan.  He left the U.S. diplomatic corps with the rank of Career Ambassador.  Wayne is also a Senior Non-Resident Adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and at the Atlantic Council.  He serves on the Board of the American Academy of Diplomacy.  Wayne speaks, writes and consults on a range of international and management topics.

2021 Articles

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Getting Down to the Business of Action

The summit constituted the first of its kind since 2016. Thei leaders of the United States, Canada and Mexico set an agenda that could power all three countries to rebound more effectively from the pandemic’s effects and unlock the important potential of better cooperation across the continent. Biden, Trudeau and López Obrador were positioned to greatly increase collaboration: 1) to support rebuilding from pandemic’s blows to the continent’s deeply integrated value chains and industries; 2) to

Opinion: Resuming North American leaders summits could accomplish much

David Jacobson was the U.S. ambassador to Canada from 2009 to 2013 and is vice-chair, BMO Financial Group. Earl Anthony Wayne was the U.S. ambassador to Mexico from 2011 to 2015 and is co-chair of the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute Advisory Board and a Distinguished Diplomat in Residence at American University’s School of International Service. The leaders of the United States, Canada and Mexico will meet Nov. 18 for a North American Leaders’ Summit, or NALS. The agenda will be big and important.

Washington’s Highest Western Hemisphere Priority

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico The most important bilateral relationship in Latin America for the United States is that with Mexico. Mexico is one of America’s top two trade partners and largest export markets. Economic ties support millions of jobs on both sides of the border. Mexico is an indispensable partner in improving management of migration across the southern border. Cooperation with Mexico is essential to getting a better handle on the deadly flows of drugs i

Mexico: Highest U.S. Priority in the Western Hemisphere

The most important bilateral relationship in Latin America for the United States is that with Mexico. Mexico is one of America’s top two trade partners and largest export markets. Economic ties support millions of jobs on both sides of the border. Mexico is an indispensable partner in improving management of migration across the southern border. Cooperation with Mexico is essential to getting a better handle on the deadly flows of drugs into the U.S. from Mexico, as well as getting better contro

Revised HLED Will Enhance Binational Cooperation

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico In a bid to revive economic relations and make Mexico and the United States more competitive with China, leaders of the two countries have launched a renewed cabinet-level High Level Economic Dialogue (HLED), dormant since 2017. To underscore that initiative, Vice President Kamala Harris headed a U.S. delegation consisting of the secretaries of state, commerce, Homeland Security, and the U.S. Trade Representative in a meeting at the White

Bringing Supply Chains Back to Mexico

I was happy to contribute an article to this collection. Introduction: In a bid to revive economic relations and make Mexico and the United States more competitive with China, leaders of the two countries have launched a renewed Cabinet-level High Level Economic Dialogue (HLED), dormant since 2017. To underscore that initiative, Vice President Kamala Harris headed a US delegation consisting of the Secretaries of State, Commerce, Homeland Security, and the US Trade Representative in a meeting at the White House with Mexico’s foreign and commerce ministers and others on September 9. If done well and accompanied by Mexican moves to improve the investment climate, the HLED process can encourage more nearshoring of manufacturing and other businesses to Mexico, contributing to more resilient supply chains. Binational working groups are working to identify objectives and actions with plans to report on progress by early November. The HLED is aimed at pursuing economic opportunities beyond the trade issues covered in the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which took effect in 2020. The USMCA calls for new consultative mechanisms on such issues as trade rules for auto production, respect for labor rights, and barriers to trade in agricultural products. As a complement to the new dialogue, the HLED can also help strengthen value chains and effective nearshoring in key sectors, generating “good” jobs on both sides of the border

Bilateral Effort for a Common Good

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico The United States and Mexico took important steps toward better cooperation against cross-border crime and criminal networks on Oct. 8. Meeting in Mexico City, cabinet members from both countries approved a new framework to replace the Merida Initiative, which had served as the umbrella for bilateral public security cooperation since 2008. Now, teams from both countries aim to hammer out an agreed action agenda by year’s end and then forge

Drugs, guns and money: US, Mexico step up cooperation against cross-border crime

The United States and Mexico took an important step toward restoring better cooperation against cross-border crime today with cabinet-level U.S.-Mexico high-level security dialogue and agreement to flesh out a new framework for cooperation in the months ahead. Secretary of State Antony Blinken Antony BlinkenSenate Democrat says hundreds of Americans, Afghan allies arrived in Qatar after being stranded in Afghan airport Blinken, new Japanese counterpart share concerns on North Korea Israeli forei

What Will the U.S.- Mexico Economic Talks Accomplish?

Earl Anthony Wayne, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and co-chair of the Mexico Institute Advisory Board at the Wilson Center: “Mexican and U.S. ministers launched the renewed High-Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) with an agenda aimed at boosting supply chains, border management, jobs skills, stakeholder dialogue and helping reduce migration flows. Done well, this process can energize bilateral economic relations with more inclusive processes and concrete improvements. Progress reports from working groups are due in early November. This new HLED recognizes the value of sustained cooperation as demonstrated from 2013-2016 and of learning from the pandemic, which exposed weaknesses in cross-border supply chains. It also reflects agreement to address the root causes of migration. There are four pillars for HLED work. The first pillar, ‘building back together,’ includes steps to support the creation of more resilient supply chains and modernizing the U.S.-Mexico border. Semiconductor supply chains will get a first review, with electric vehicle, medical device and pharmaceutical supply chains as additional candidates. Importantly, work includes renewed attention to improving border crossing processes and infrastructure, as well as better dialogue with private and subfederal government stakeholders. The HLED’s second pillar, ‘promoting sustainable economic and social development in Southern Mexico and Central America,’ will entail the hard work of trying to identify the mix of programs to produce good results. The third pillar, ‘securing tools for future prosperity,’ can foster needed cooperation on cybersecurity and resilient information technology networks. The fourth pillar, ‘investing in our people,’ gives needed attention to workforce development, such as applying best practices for upskilling workers and can usefully target specific groups in need and small and medium enterprises (SMEs).”

The Return of the HLED

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico A modified version of this article previously appeared in he U.S. congressional publication The Hill, and is being republished in Pulse News Mexico with express prior permission. Heed closely what Mexico and the United States agreed on earlier this month. On Thursday, Sept. 9, ministers from both governments held the first meeting of a new High-Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) aimed at pursuing economic opportunities beyond the trade issues

The US and Mexico take steps to strengthen ties

Watch closely what Mexico and the United States agree on this week. On Thursday, Sept. 9, ministers from both governments will hold the first meeting of a new High-Level Economic Dialogue (HLED) aimed at pursuing economic opportunities beyond the trade issues covered in the new North America trade agreement — the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA — that took effect in mid-2020. In the USMCA framework, the governments already are overseeing bilateral trade and working through trade

5 Questions on Afghanistan: What Brought Us to This Point, and Where Do We Go Now?

The Taliban took Kabul, Afghanistan, far faster than US intelligence officials had anticipated; evacuations out of the country are enveloped in chaos; and on August 26, deadly attacks took place at the Kabul airport. How did we get to this point? Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne, SIS professor and distinguished diplomat in residence, served as coordinating director for development and economic affairs and deputy ambassador in Kabul from 2009 to 2011. In this Q&A, he describes how the Taliban was ab

The Hard Lessons Learned from Afghanistan

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. deputy ambassador to Afghanistan Ending a war well requires an accurate assessment of the facts, careful weighing of the potential costs, and plans for achieving the desired outcomes and dealing with unexpected repercussions: There will be plenty of re-examination of the U.S. decision in April to give a September date certain for pulling out of Afghanistan, but events over the last few months make clear that the final U.S. decisions were based on a poor under

Lessons, Credibility and Priorities for Afghanistan

There will be plenty of re-examination of the U.S. decision in April to give a September date certain for pulling out of Afghanistan, but events over the last few months make clear that the final U.S. decisions were based on a poor understanding of the damage already done to Afghan government morale, authority, and capacity by the U.S. negotiations with the Taliban, during the last two years of the Trump administration. The Taliban had used the last two years while negotiating with the United St

Five Things to Know about the Taliban

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. deputy ambassador to Afghanistan Now that the Taliban has regained control of Afghanistan after 20 years of U.S. efforts to halt their brutal reign, it is important to understand who they are and what are their objectives. Why were the Taliban able to advance so quickly? The U.S. announcement in April of a full withdrawal by September, combined with little evidence that the United States would provide the robust support that it had promised after its troops

5 Things to Know about the Taliban’s Advance in Afghanistan

Since the Taliban launched their offensive in May, they have made rapid advances in Afghanistan while US troops have been withdrawing from the country. Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne, SIS professor and distinguished diplomat in residence, served as coordinating director for development and economic affairs and deputy ambassador in Kabul, Afghanistan, from 2009 to 2011. Ambassador Wayne has written numerous pieces about the US’s presence in Afghanistan and shared with us five important things to k

The US Can Still Save Afghanistan

Staging a major military offensive. Ignoring calls for peace negotiations. Threatening women and executing prisoners and civilians. Given the Taliban’s behavior lately, U.S. President Joe Biden’s decision to rapidly withdraw U.S. forces from Afghanistan appears increasingly questionable. While it’s not certain that the Afghan resistance to the Taliban will crumble, a catastrophic outcome is still possible. Abandoning a courageous people as they attempt to fight back could leave millions of Afgh

Don't lose Afghanistan

Staging a major military offensive. Ignoring calls for peace negotiations. Threatening women and executing prisoners and civilians. Given the Taliban’s behavior lately, US President Joe Biden’s decision to rapidly withdraw US forces from Afghanistan appears increasingly questionable. While it’s not certain the Afghan resistance to the Taliban will crumble, a catastrophic outcome is still possible. Abandoning a courageous people as they attempt to fight back could leave millions of Afghans vulne
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Biden’s electric vehicle plans spark outrage in Mexico and Canada

Biden’s electric vehicle plans spark outrage in Mexico and Canada US trading partners insist that EV incentives breach terms of USMCA pact Aime Williams and Christine Murray Joe Biden will meet the leaders of Mexico and Canada this week as his plans to encourage Americans to buy electric cars made in the US have sparked furious opposition from two of America’s biggest trading partners. The so-called three amigos summit, to be held at the White House, will take place for the first time since 2016, and comes as senior officials in Mexico City and Ottawa have complained that Biden’s plans to kickstart EV manufacturing in the US break international trade rules. The opposition of some of the US’s closest allies to a flagship climate policy poses a political and diplomatic dilemma for Biden. The president has pledged to both lower tensions with trading partners following the tumultuous tenure of Donald Trump, and to use industrial policy to boost green industries like electric car manufacturing. Although not yet passed into law, Biden’s broader $1.75tn legislative package contains proposals to offer a tax credit of $7,500 for electric vehicles made only in the US from 2026. Another $4,500 of tax credits are available for purchasing electric cars made with union labour. On Friday, Mélanie Joly, Canada’s foreign minister, said she had raised the issue in a meeting with Antony Blinken, US secretary of state. Mary Ng, Canada’s trade minister, has previously written to the Democratic and Republican leaders and to Katherine Tai, US trade representative, and Gina Raimondo, US commerce secretary, to convey Ottawa’s “very serious concerns” about the EV credits. Ng’s office said that Washington’s proposed measures were “inconsistent” both with its obligations under USMCA, the updated North American trade deal struck between the three countries under Donald Trump, and with the rules of the World Trade Organization. Tatiana Clouthier, Mexico’s economy minister, has sent her own letters to US legislators to ask that the proposals be altered to be brought in line with USMCA. “It’s contradictory,” Clouthier said. “They would set off more [migration] with this kind of measure.” Tai refused to be drawn this week on whether the US proposals contravened the USMCA trade agreement that she helped broker as the Democrats’ chief trade counsel in the House of Representatives. “I’m aware of concerns that our trading partners have raised, and we care about these concerns,” she said. Edward Alden, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, said the growing dispute between the three nations was “a big deal”. “Everybody is moving at warp speed towards electric vehicles, and auto companies are now deciding where to locate their electric vehicle factories,” Alden said. “This tax credit gives pretty strong incentives to locate final assembly in the United States so, not surprisingly, the Canadians and Mexicans are deeply worried about it.” At present, the North American motor industry supply chain is scattered across all three countries. According to a recent report by the Congressional Research Service, some car parts cross the US, Mexican and Canadian borders “seven or eight times” before they are assembled into the final vehicle. The US imports $29.4bn of car parts from Mexico and exports $5.9bn of parts to Canada, while exporting $11.7bn of completed vehicles to Canada and $67.5bn to Mexico. The CRS says that vehicle parts exported to Canada and Mexico often return to the US to be incorporated into the finished vehicles. “It’s important to remember that the auto industry is the most quintessential North American, USMCA or Nafta industry,” said Tony Wayne, a former US ambassador to Mexico, referring to USMCA’s predecessor trade deal. “It’s more integrated than any other industry.” Canada has suggested that US threats to rupture the motor industry’s integration at this time might backfire on the US. Ng’s letter reminded US officials that Canada was “the only country” in the western hemisphere to have stores of all of the critical minerals needed to build an electric vehicle battery, and that Canada was therefore “necessary for the United States to achieve its electric vehicle objectives in the future”. Mexico’s lower labour costs have long attracted carmakers, but sector leaders are already worried that it may not be able to attract a renewed investment boom in the shift to EVs. ...

Roundtable Recap: U.S.-Mexico Automotive Forum

Event Recap: A Vision For A Stronger U.S.-Mexico Partnership: Emerging Opportunities In The Automotive Industry Virtual Roundtable On Nov. 5, 2021, the William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan and the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, in collaboration with the U.S.-Mexico Foundation (USMF), hosted a virtual roundtable to discuss further integration within the auto industry in the U.S. and Mexico. The event brought together accomplished diplomats, industry leaders and analysts to share their perspectives on trends and opportunities for players in both countries. For decades, the U.S.-Mexico automotive supply chain has been deeply unified, collectively manufacturing around 20 percent of the world’s passenger cars and commercial vehicles. At the same time, the automotive sector is undergoing a profound transformation, fueled by technological innovations, sustainability efforts and supply chain concerns. During the virtual roundtable, two interrelated, consecutive panel discussions focused on these shifts and how both sides of the border can leverage them in the context of an enhanced U.S.–Mexico partnership. Panel 1, “U.S.-Mexico Automotive Supply Chain Resilience: Trends and Opportunities,” put a spotlight on emerging opportunities for co-production and manufacturing of products, services and technologies, which have the potential to catalyze further economic growth in the U.S. and Mexico. It was moderated by Francine LaFontaine, Interim Dean of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, and the panel consisted of: Gerónimo Gutiérrez, former Mexican Ambassador to the U.S. Earl Anthony Wayne, former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Sarah Cartmell, Manager of Global Government Relations, Ford Motor Company Oscar Dominguez, President of Lear Mexico Operations

Building the Digital Manufacturing Corridor on the US/Mexico Border

Happy to Join North American Development Bank Managing Director Calixto Mateos, IBC Bank Gerry Schwebel and Kathy Neal of Regal Rexnord Corporation to talk about US-Mexico border infrastructure at the 13th North America Strategic Leadership Forum, https://www.cg-la.com/forums/nalf13 The event is available to watch at: https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/nhtd6x7n4pc1tc97k8vm6/Building-the-Manufacturing-Corridor-on-the-US-Mexico-Border.mp4?dl=0&oref=e&r=ABgG59b6h8iDQDX_Q-KagOdG5z7_2i3wCuTEj0ZNJm38zpv8F09NI_Kq_kAJCa5wvMa29mKs-sok0BjAQMrC_8OG3QYvpgRb_-Sgk5ScFFiiOQ2Q2yYEb3FvE6Fxv6kRmzQDegL7MzZav2l9jxGVRWbKmHGoecDGJzjBhCOTIDa0rR2f7CSiGcW-IdkZPBFI0qo24AsdXktiLsNhmig6I8SP&sm=1

Can U.S. Anti-Violence Models Succeed in Mexico and the Northern Triangle?

Several seniors at American University's School of International Service began this study in a Spring 2020 Diplomacy Lab course that I led and they continued their research and related work for over a year. That hard and excellent work is embodied in this publication by the Wilson Center. The Wilson Center’s prestigious Latin American Program provides non-partisan expertise to a broad community of decision makers in the United States and Latin America on critical policy issues facing the Hemisphere. The Program provides insightful and actionable research for policymakers, private sector leaders, journalists, and public intellectuals in the United States and Latin America. To bridge the gap between scholarship and policy action, it fosters new inquiry, sponsors high-level public a

Discussion with Former Officials on Afghanistan

IR INSIDER A Discussion with Former Senior Officials on U.S. Policy and the Future of Afghanistan October 26, 2021 / Alexis Tretschok Panelists Michael Kugelman, Ronald Neumann, James Cunningham, Earl Anthony Wayne, Annie Pforzheimer, and Robin Raphel (top left to bottom right) Key Points The United States faces three main policy concerns after the withdrawal from Afghanistan: evacuation of remaining citizens, delivery of humanitarian support to Afghan people, and plans for negotiating with the Taliban regime U.S. decision-making regarding Afghanistan requires clearly defined goals The U.S. cannot help Afghanistan alone and needs a comprehensive approach involving collaboration with allies and international organizations Summary On Oct. 19, 2021, 3:00 p.m. EST, The Asia Program affiliated with the Wilson Center hosted a virtual discussion entitled, “Hindsight Up Front: A Discussion with Former Senior Officials on U.S. Policy and the Future of Afghanistan” with a group of former senior U.S. officials to communicate what the country’s top priorities should be in Afghanistan and how they can be accomplished. Michael Kugelman began the discussion by explaining the major policy challenges the Biden administration faces in Afghanistan two months after the withdrawal. These policy concerns include evacuating any remaining U.S. citizens, delivering humanitarian assistance, overseeing the maintenance of human rights, and developing strategies to further combat terrorism. Panelists were asked their opinion on what the current ultimate priority should be. Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Ron Neumann emphasized the need for the U.S. to maintain a strategic approach to control terrorism in Afghanistan (something that could also be a threat to the United States). He maintained that national security should be the first priority, but after that, the U.S. should be evacuating its citizens safely and aiding the Afghan people. Former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia Robin Raphel furthered the debate by disagreeing with Neumann. He said that the most pressing issue is the Afghan state and its people. Raphel stated that we have not stopped monitoring counterterrorism since 2001 and it already has a lot of attention. Instead, the U.S. needs to focus on issues they do not currently have a hold on, which in this case means salvaging Afghan institutions and providing aid to Afghan citizens. U.S. service members leave Afghanistan on Aug. 31, 2021. Photo: US Air Force / REUTERS Former Ambassador John B. Cunningham agreed with Raphel by pointing out how close Afghanistan is to becoming a failed state. He further said that it is an international obligation to prevent this from happening. Cunningham specified that the U.S. needs to gather its resources with international partners to properly stabilize the country. Former U.S. Deputy Chief of Mission in Afghanistan Annie Pforzheimer called on the Biden Administration to simply take these issues seriously, stressing the importance of acting now. At this point, there were three paths the discussion could take. The first involved helping U.S. citizens (which includes aiding in evacuations). The second is the humanitarian challenge which involves persuading larger donors like the U.N. as well as NGOs to support Afghan citizens independent of the Taliban. Lastly, there must be some form of engagement with the Taliban to prioritize future progress and institutional reform. Raphel said evacuations and citizen resettlement depend on the U.S. but it is simultaneously the only thing the U.S. can effectively do on its own. We have to accept that removing the Taliban is out of our capabilities and our continued involvement in their affairs only encourages them to push back more. Instead, the U.S. must observe and aid the restructuring of Afghan institutions to allow better governance in the future. Cunningham wrapped up the conversation by reiterating that no other country is capable of doing what the U.S. can do for Afghanistan; more than that, many see the U.S. as responsible for the dire situation in which Afghanistan finds itself. The U.S. made a commitment to protect the people of Afghanistan from terrorist threats and maintain their security, which is something that was not upheld in the withdrawal and certainly has not been honored since. Cunningham expressed his concerns for the current violations of Afghan human rights, citing how women in particular have lost many significant freedoms since the Taliban takeover. The U.S. cannot forget that as we debate our future initiatives in Afghanistan, many individuals continue to suffer. As the U.S. continues to deliberate on policy matters regarding Afghanistan, we have to remember that there are urgent matters that need our action. Many Afghan communities are at risk and while we gather support for future developments, the U.S. can begin assisting Afghan citizens to improve their standards of living. This report was compiled by Alexis Tretschok on October 26, 2021, and edited by Sophie Slade.

Colin Powell Remembered - Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne, The ARISE Interview

As millions of Americans and millions more around the world continue to digest the heartbreaking news that the former US secretary of state, Colin Powell, has died of covid complications at the age of 84, we reflect on his life less ordinary, because he did so many things beyond the ordinary, opening doors and offering hope for a brighter future. He was a politician, diplomat, statesman and four-star general, who served as the 65th US Secretary of State - the first African American to hold that post - standing 4th in the presidential line of succession. He was also the first black American national security adviser and the first African American chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. How's that for a life less ordinary? Today we pay tribute to Colin Powell, a deserving son of African America, African Caribbean and the continent of Africa - the man they called the north star to a generation of senior American officers and diplomats...Godspeed and open water to a General for the ages. #tai #theariseinterview #charlesaniagolu #arisnews #arisetv #EarlAnthonyWayne #COLINPOWELL Subscribe to our Channel for high profile interviews. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ARISEtv | and Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/arisenewsofficial | and Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AriseTVNews | Check out our website www.arise.tv

Hindsight: A Discussion with Former Senior Officials on U.S. Policy and the Future of Afghanistan

Just weeks after the completion of the U.S. military withdrawal, the Biden administration confronts major policy challenges in Taliban-led Afghanistan. These include evacuations, humanitarian assistance, human rights, and terrorism. Many of these issues were discussed on October 9 and 10, when U.S. officials met with Taliban representatives in Qatar. The latest event of the Wilson Center’s Afghanistan: Hindsight Up Front initiative convenes a group of former senior U.S. officials to discuss what the top U.S. policy priorities should be in Afghanistan moving forward—and how they can best be achieved. Ambassador Wayne moderates a discussion of Ambassadors Neuman, Cunningham, Raphel and fore US diplomat Pforzheimer.

Presentación libro Relaciónes México-EUA.

My contribution in English comes at about 54 minutes into the video. El Consejo Mexicano de Asuntos Internacionales presenta el libro “Relaciones México-Estados Unidos en 2021: ¿un punto de transición?”, coordinado por Hazel Blackmore y Olga Pellicer. Este libro analiza la relación entre ambos países y contribuye a un mayor entendimiento mutuo. Participan Martha Bárcena y Anthony Wayne. Modera Sergio Alcocer.
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2020 Articles

Fulfilling North America's Promise

Key Policy Recommendations • Establish cooperative work agendas addressing key economic and security issues. • Re-organize structures to take full advantage of the opportunities from North American cooperation, as well as to resolve problems. • Reinitiate the North American Leaders' Summits, preferably once a year, but at least every two years. • Make supply chains more resilient and less dependent on distant suppliers. • Re-create and improve bilateral mechanisms to deal with homeland security and economic issues outside of USMCA. • Establish a multi-layered approach to North America that effectively incorporates the many stakeholders in North America's success. • In the short-term, agendas should include COVID-19 management and recovery; strengthening supply chains; implementing USMCA; revisiting border security; bolstering law enforcement coordination; and rethinking migration management and aid to Central America. • The medium- and longer-term agendas should include creating a shared vision and structures that enhance mutual prosperity and security, and a focus on issues such as climate change, “green” energy futures, workforce development, the deployment of new technologies, and more cooperative approaches to cybersecurity.

The High Stakes of the US-Mexico Relationship - Pulse News Mexico

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Mexico and the United States cannot escape the need to collaborate. The big test is how well the governments can work together with the arrival of President Joe Biden. The action agenda is urgent: handling migration from Central America, deepening anti-crime coordination, managing the pandemic and recovery, and implementing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), including Mexico’s treatment of energy investments and protection

Biden’s Trade Policy Needs Commercial Diplomacy

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE and SHAUN DONNELLY, both former U.S. ambassadors The new Joe Biden administration has a great opportunity to rebuild the United States’ international competitiveness and policy effectiveness in ways to assure that the domestic and international policy agendas reinforce each other. This approach can build prosperity at home and simultaneously establish markets, opportunities and partnerships internationally. The appointments of Jake Sullivan as national security adviser an

US-Mexico Relations

Earl Anthony Wayne, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and co-chair of the Mexico Institute Advisory Board at the Wilson Center: “Mexico and the United States cannot escape the need to collaborate. The big test is how well the governments can work together with the arrival of President Joe Biden. The action agenda is urgent: handling migration from Central America, deepening anti-crime coordination, managing the pandemic and recovery, and implementing the USMCA trade agreement including Mexico’s treatment of energy investments and protection of labor rights. The opportunities are also great: building on the USMCA to boost both economies, enhancing homeland security and reinforcing trust undermined in recent years. President Biden arrives with the deepest understanding of Mexico of any U.S. president. His strong predilection is to reinforce cooperation. Until recently, however, President López Obrador (AMLO) was not welcoming. He also placed a serious legal wrench in Mexico-U.S. anti-crime cooperation. One can debate why AMLO adopted this stance, but the challenge is whether the leaders and their teams can rebuild enough trust to find and implement solutions. The stakes are immense. Legal trade is about $1 million per minute. That represents about 80 percent of Mexico’s imports. That trade supports almost five million U.S. jobs. Illicit drug trade fuels tens of thousands of deaths in each country via drug overdoses and criminal violence. A new surge of Central American migrants would spark a crisis for the Biden administration. U.S. companies and unions are worried about Mexico’s implementation of the USMCA. Much work remains to deal with the pandemic’s effects. The neighbors should quickly establish the dialogue and processes to manage these challenges well.”

Biden Team Must Forge Early Security Strategy

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico U.S. President-elect Joe Biden’s emerging national security team has impressive credentials, reflecting his own deep experience. This will be a big advantage, given the need to “build back better” with the world as well as at home. The tasks include rebuilding institutions battered over the past four years, including the State Department, the intelligence community, and law enforcement and justice agencies. The daunting international agen

Biden's trade policy needs effective commercial diplomacy

The incoming Biden administration has a great opportunity to rebuild America’s international competitiveness and policy effectiveness in ways to assure that the domestic and international policy agendas reinforce each other. This approach can build prosperity at home and simultaneously establish markets, opportunities and partnerships internationally. The appointments of Jake Sullivan Jake SullivanBiden formally appoints NSA's Anne Neuberger to key national security position How should Biden re

The Way Forward in Afghanistan

Among the most pressing issues on U.S. President-elect Joe Biden’s to-do list on foreign policy is the war in Afghanistan, which offers only hard choices. But despite the blunders of U.S. President Donald Trump, Afghanistan may actually now have a chance to achieve some form of political settlement and significantly reduced violence. To pursue a path toward sustainable peace in Afghanistan, Biden’s team must walk a fine line. On the one hand, they must make it clear that peace does not mean sim

The way forward in Afghanistan: How Biden can achieve sustainable peace and US security

Among the most pressing issues on the US president-elect’s to-do list on foreign policy is the war in Afghanistan, which offers only hard choices. But despite the blunders of President Donald Trump, Afghanistan may actually now have a chance to achieve some form of political settlement and significantly reduced violence. To pursue a path toward sustainable peace in Afghanistan, Joe Biden’s team must walk a fine line. On the one hand, they must make it clear that peace does not mean simply handi

A Better Way Forward for Mexico

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico Mexico’s Congress passed legislation on Dec.15 that restricts the work of foreign government employees in a way that could greatly inhibit U.S.-Mexico cooperation against powerful cross-border criminal organizations, which are moving drugs northward to the United States and arms and illicit proceeds to Mexico. Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) signed the law and it took effect on Dec. 19. Before this grows into a very d

Biden's team must forge an early national security strategy — and better processes

President-elect Biden’s emerging national security team has impressive credentials, reflecting his own deep experience. This will be a big advantage, given the need to “build back better” with the world as well as at home. The tasks include rebuilding institutions battered over the past four years, including the State Department, the intelligence community, and law enforcement and justice agencies. The daunting international agenda makes it imperative that the president and his advisers draw on

Imaging Peace in Afghanistan

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, career diplomat, ambassador and senior advisor with the Project on Prosperity and Development at theCenter for Strategic and International Studies The following report was first published by the U.S. Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and is being republished in an abbreviated format in Pulse News Mexico with explicit prior permission. This report identifies best practices among reconciliation programs used in conflicts around the world that may help p

A better way forward than Mexico's new anti-crime legislation

Mexico’s Congress passed legislation on Dec.15 that restricts the work of foreign government employees in a way that could greatly inhibit U.S.-Mexico cooperation against powerful cross-border criminal organizations, which are moving drugs northward to the U.S. and arms and illicit proceeds to Mexico. President López Obrador signed the law and it took effect on Dec. 19. Before this grows into a very damaging bilateral problem, the two governments urgently need to engage to address the serious a

Imagine Peace: Connecting Global Solutions on Reconciliation with an Afghanistan Ready for Peace

Imagine Peace: Connecting Global Solutions on Reconciliation with an Afghanistan Ready for Peace • This report identifies best practices among reconciliation programs used in conflicts around the world that may help promote reconciliation in Afghanistan, should progress toward peace advance. A team of American University undergraduate researchers at the School of International Service worked under the guidance of former ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne to examine scores of programs in over 30 count

High Profile Tests for Mexican Justice, Bilateral Cooperation

By EARL ANTHONY WAYNE, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico Mexico’s law enforcement and justice system is now in the spotlight over U.S.-Mexico cross-border crime. Mexico’ public security and justice systems currently face a series of “stress tests”: handling charges against two former Mexican secretaries for aiding criminal groups trafficking drugs to the United States; the still-ongoing investigation of the November 2018 murders of U.S. citizen women and children in Sonora by members of criminal ...

Are Mexico and the U.S. Putting Politics Above the Law?

“The U.S. arrest and release to Mexico of retired Mexican Defense Secretary Salvador Cienfuegos on charges of supporting a drug-smuggling group has set up a high-profile test for Mexico’s justice system. Many questions swirl around the general’s arrest, release and future treatment in Mexico, especially the chances for a credible Mexican prosecution. Mexico’s handling of General Cienfuegos’ case will have a significant impact on U.S.-Mexican cooperation against deadly cross-border organized crime. Most important to watch for the long term will be how the management of the case strengthens or weakens bilateral collaboration against drug-trafficking groups that cause tens of thousands of deaths in the United States and Mexico. We must keep the real costs of trafficking in focus. Mexico’s foreign minister and president have spoken positively about Mexico’s ability to carry out a serious investigation of Cienfuegos. Other experts are skeptical, given the poor record of Mexico’s justice system on cases involving high-profile individuals. In this case, electronic evidence collected by U.S. authorities without a Mexican judge’s approval may not be admissible in Mexican courts. If the case falters, a bright spotlight will shine on still-existing flaws in Mexico’s judicial system. A poorly handled case will further erode confidence among U.S. law enforcement officials in their Mexican partners and will erode confidence among honest Mexican officials in their system. To bolster trust, the two governments must build new mechanisms to help prevent corruption of officials from either country, as part of work to strengthen and expand effective cooperation against cross-border trafficking.” by me and other experts on the arrest and release to Mexico of retired General Salvador Cienfuegos related to charges of supporting a drug trafficking group.

El caso Cienfuegos: la gran prueba para el sistema judicial de México

La captura y liberación del exsecretario de la Defensa Nacional, Salvador Cienfuegos es una gran prueba para el sistema de justicia mexicano. Pero también subraya los desafíos a una relación bilateral más profunda y efectiva para la cooperación contra el narcotráfico. El caso Cienfuegos está drenando la confianza en ambos lados de la frontera. Como secretario de la Defensa, entre 2012 y 2014, Cienfuegos supervisó la cooperación militar cercana entre México y Estados Unidos. Sin embargo, las aut

Biden Will Boost Regional Ties

A Joe Biden administration can be expected to put U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada relations back into a strategic framework for solving problems and strengthening long-term cooperation. This would include pursuing a more consistent approach to Mexico and Canada, less driven by individual issues and tradeoffs and more concerned with achieving progress across a range of key issues, stretching from trade to public security to economic competitiveness to the environment.
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2020 - Interviews, Speeches, Talks, Presentations, Testimonies, Media mentions, etc.

SIS Students Worked and Shared Findings with the State Department

The Diplomacy Lab SIS Capstone centers on a research project deemed important for the US State Department. It is a unique opportunity for SIS students to work with State Department officials, career diplomats, ambassadors, and people who are currently working in the Foreign Service. Launched in 2013, the Diplomacy Lab aims to address two key priorities: first, to engage the American people in the work of diplomacy, and second, to broaden the State Department’s research base.

U.S. Evidence Against Mexican Ex-Defense Minister Raises Conviction Doubts

Explosive U.S. drug-trafficking allegations against Mexico’s former defense minister rely largely on circumstantial evidence, diminishing the chances that the Mexican government could bring a case against him to trial or could convict him in a Mexican court if it did, according to people in both countries familiar with the case. American agents arrested Gen. Salvador Cienfuegos in October as he arrived in Los Angeles for a family vacation, accusing him of taking bribes in exchange for protectin

1 big thing: When Joe meets AMLO

Biden (then VP) and López Obrador (then a presidential candidate) in Mexico City in 2012. Photo: Uri Cortez/AFP via Getty Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is off to an awkward start with President-elect Biden. Along with Russia’s Vladimir Putin and Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro, he's one of the very few world leaders still declining to recognize Biden’s victory. Why it matters: López Obrador’s stance may soon be forgotten, but it could foreshadow tensions in a relationship that will be

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/12/02/biden-migrant-caravans/

Biden will need Mexico to continue to help prevent such a surge in the short term, said Earl Anthony Wayne, who served as U.S. ambassador to Mexico under President Barack Obama. Wayne said the United States also will need to partner with other countries on medium- and long-term solutions to improve conditions in Central America and the treatment of migrants in Mexico and the United States. “Biden will not have an easy set of choices, but I think he will try to thread the needle between a more humanitarian approach and a need to avoid getting overwhelmed,” said Wayne, who teaches at American University. “What he can do is try to forge a more effective partnership with Mexico to see the common value of dealing with this in an orderly way, and not letting it get out of hand.”

Ex-national security officials warn of risks in Biden transition delay

Several former Trump administration national security and diplomatic officials also signed on, including former U.S. ambassador to Iraq Doug Silliman; former NSC senior director for counterterrorism Javed Ali; former DHS assistant secretary of counterterrorism Elizabeth Neumann; former DHS deputy assistant secretary for counterterrorism policy Tom Warrick; and former U.S. ambassador to the U.K. Lewis Lukens. I was happy to join in this effort.

Del muro al espinoso caso Cienfuegos: radiografía de lo que viene en la relación México - EEUU por el exembajador Anthony Wayne

En las últimas semanas el tema que ha mantenido los reflectores del mundo entero es, sin duda, la elección presidencial en Estados Unidos. Y uno de los países más interesados –sino es que el principal– en el resultado de esos comicios . Y no es para menos. México no solo es el vecino del sur de Estados Unidos. Su vínculo también incluye una fuerte relación en temas humanitarios, como la migración; económicos, como el nuevo tratado comercial (T-MEC); de seguridad, como la cooperación en temas de

México, Estados Unidos y la promesa migratoria que jamás llegó

Quoted in the following article: Un análisis de las políticas migratorias de Estados Unidos, y qué significaría una reelección de Trump o el triunfo de Biden para las relaciones con México. Cuando comenzó su apuesta por la presidencia en 2015, la narrativa antinmigrante, como sus críticos la denuncian, se convirtió en el centro de la campaña de Donald Trump. Él prometió frente a audiencias entusiasmadas construir un muro en la frontera y sostuvo que México “no envía a su mejor” gente al territorio estadounidense ...

Sixth North American Process Symposium: Economic Coordination and Adaptation

The School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary, the School of Global Studies at Universidad Anáhuac México, and the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions at Arizona State University, in association with The Wilson Center in Washington D.C., were proud to host the Sixth Annual North American Process Symposium: Economic Coordination and Adaptation. In an era of a global pandemic, regional trade uncertainty, tensions with China, devastated supply chains, and increased d

Exembajadores de México y Estados Unidos aportan recomendaciones para mejorar relación entre ambos países

Exembajadores de México y Estados Unidos presentaron una serie de recomendaciones para fortalecer y potencializar la relación bilateral entre ambos países, en materia de seguridad, migración y agua. Ello en el marco de una reunión virtual con la Comisión de Relaciones Exteriores América del Norte. John Dimitri Negroponte, ex embajador de Washington en México, reconoció que la agenda de seguridad, siempre ha sido un tema delicado para los dos países, sobre todo, en lo referente al tráfico de dro

National Security Leaders for Biden

We are former public servants who have devoted our careers, and in many cases risked our lives, for the United States. We are generals, admirals, senior noncommissioned officers, ambassadors, and senior civilian national security leaders. We are Republicans, Democrats, and Independents. We love our country. Unfortunately, we also fear for it. The COVID-19 pandemic has proven America needs principled, wise, and responsible leadership. America needs a President who understands, as President Harry
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2019 Articles

USMCA: Approval and Economic Boost in Sight

A big push is under way to achieve approval in the U.S. House of Representatives for the newly amended United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), the new NAFTA, before the end of the year. The deadline goal appears to be congressional action by Dec. 20, at the latest. Supporters of USMCA are working hard to complete the procedures needed for action by in the U.S. House of Representatives and to secure as many votes as possible there for the agreement, so the USMCA heads to the U.S. Senate w

North America 2.0: A Workforce Development Agenda

A new report examining the need for the United States, Mexico and Canada to collaborate on workforce development in order to better meet the massive challenges of new technologies transforming work and workplaces over the next few years. governments, the private sector, educational institutions need to find and implement new models of skills training and preparing for the changes brought by new technology or face serious social, political and economic disruptions.

USMCA: So near, or just too far?

A big push is under way to achieve U.S. approval for the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), the new NAFTA, but important gaps remain between the parties. The most recent deadline goal appears to be congressional action by Dec. 20, at the latest. Missing that deadline could delay approval until 2021 and leave the continent’s economies under a cloud of uncertainty. Approving the USMCA could bring a needed economic boost to the millions of jobs supported by commerce with America’s two largest t

A Fresh Approach to Peace in Afghanistan

An effective peace process is possible and desirable in Afghanistan. Success, however, will require a careful, step-by-step course to test bona fides, build confidence, reduce violence and encourage the difficult negotiations in which Afghans themselves determine the political future of Afghanistan. U.S. Special Representative Zalmay Khalilzad has been working to re-engage the peace process in visits to the region, in meetings with international players, and in fostering last month’s detainee s

Apprenticeship and Other Work-Based Learning Programs in North America

The apprenticeship movement is reshaping skills, policies, and programs in the United States at a critical moment in our country’s history. I was happy to be leader author in the first article in this reader. The collection offers a chorus of voices emanating from different countries and populations, echoing commitment to bright, sustainable workforce futures through a well-crafted approach to this talent development model. The collected chapters and vignettes address questions for businesses of all sizes, community-based organizations, and schools looking for a way

A fresh approach to peace in Afghanistan

An effective peace process is possible and desirable in Afghanistan. Success, however, will require a careful, step-by-step course to test bona fides, build confidence, reduce violence and encourage the difficult negotiations in which Afghans themselves determine the political future of Afghanistan. U.S. Special Representative Zalmay Khalilzad has been working to re-engage the peace process in visits to the region, in meetings with international players, and in fostering the just completed deta

More Effective US-Mexico Cooperation Is Urgently Needed

An abbreviated version of the following article first appeared in Fox News Opinion and is being republished in Pulse News Mexico with specific prior permission. The horrific Nov. 4 killing of U.S. citizen women and children in Sonora, Mexico, should prompt closer and more effective U.S.-Mexico cooperation against the cross-border organized crime that is seriously endangering citizens of both countries. These transnational criminal groups are undermining the sovereignty of both countries daily.

Democrats’ Clash with Trump Must Not Imperil USMCA Passage

It is increasingly urgent that the United States achieve stability and predictability with its two largest trading partners. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) warns of a “synchronized global slowdown” powered significantly by trade tensions, and the Institute of International Finance flags 20-year highs in global trade and economic uncertainty. “Getting to Yes” on the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) this year would diminish these threats in North America. Mexico and Canada ar

Democrats' clashes with Trump must not imperil trade with Mexico and Canada

It is increasingly urgent that the United States achieve stability and predictability with its two largest trading partners. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) warns of a “synchronized global slowdown” powered significantly by trade tensions, and the Institute of International Finance flags 20-year highs in global trade and economic uncertainty. “Getting to Yes” on the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) this year would diminish these threats in North America. Mexico and Canada ar

Afghanistan: Where Do We Go from Here?

The following article first appeared in the U.S. political website “The Hill” and is being republished in Pulse News Mexico with specific prior permission. It is in the strong interest of Afghanistan, its neighbors, its international partners and especially, the United States, that the Afghanistan peace process not be abandoned, despite U.S. President Donald Trump’s declaring the U.S.-Taliban talks “dead.” No party can win a military victory any time soon in current circumstances, and Afghans

Mexico Seeking Stronger Ties with US

Because of the current U.S. trade dispute with China, Mexico has become United States’ Number 1 trade partner. Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Relations (SRE) Marcelo Ebrard met in Washington, D.C. with U.S. officials on Tuesday, Sept. 10, in an effort to put U.S.-Mexico cooperation on firmer footing, and especially to overcome U.S. threats tied to migration and move ahead with the new United States-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA). Mexico’s President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has b

Mexico, the leading US trade partner, seeks to fortify relations

Because of the U.S. trade dispute with China, Mexico has become America’s No. 1 trading partner. Mexico’s foreign minister is scheduled to be in Washington for meetings Tuesday, in an effort to put U.S.-Mexico cooperation on firmer footing, especially to overcome U.S. threats tied to migration and to move ahead with the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (USMCA). Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, known as “AMLO,” has been laboring to bring about what he views as a historic transformation in Mexico ...

US-Taliban Negotiations: How to Avoid a Rush to Failure

We strongly support a negotiated peace in Afghanistan, a limited force drawdown as part of getting peace negotiations going, and the substantial force drawdown later that peace would allow. Equally strongly, we believe that U.S. security and values, including support for women, require that a full troop withdrawal can come only after a real peace. How our troop presence is managed will have a critical influence on the chances for successful peace negotiations, the future of the fight against th

US-Taliban Negotiations: How to Avoid Rushing to Failure

This is a collaborative product of former US diplomatic officials who have worked on Afghanistan. We strongly support a negotiated peace in Afghanistan, a limited force drawdown as part of getting peace negotiations going, and the substantial force drawdown later that peace would allow. Equally strongly, we believe that US security and values, including support for women, require that a full troop withdrawal come only after a real peace. How our troop presence is managed will have a critical

Border Security and Counter-Narcotics

(The following article first appeared in the Woodrow Wilson Center’s web site and is being republished in Pulse News Mexico with specific prior permission. Cross-border criminal activity fueled by illegal drugs is causing great damage in both Mexico and the United States. The two governments need to prioritize forging an agreed strategy and action agenda to tackle this serious problem. They should establish a permanent cabinet-level group to oversee bilateral counter-narcotics and cross-border

Is Peace Actually on the Horizon in Afghanistan?

The momentum for peace in Afghanistan is growing. The progress over the last year is far more than many “Afghan hands” have imagined. At present, U.S.-Taliban talks are apparently making progress on addressing U.S. counterterrorism concerns and on U.S. military withdrawal plans and timetables. Though the Taliban have so far refused to negotiate with the Afghan government, a well-publicized informal meeting in Doha, Qatar, between Taliban members and representatives from Kabul — including women

Is Peace Actually on the Horizon in Afghanistan?

Is Peace Actually on the Horizon in Afghanistan? The momentum for peace in Afghanistan is growing. The progress over the last year is far more than many “Afghan hands” imagined. At present, U.S.-Taliban talks are apparently making progress on addressing U.S. counterterrorism concerns and on U.S. military withdrawal plans and timetables. Though the Taliban have so far refused to negotiate with the Afghan government, a well-publicized informal meeting in Doha, Qatar between Taliban members and r
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2019 - Interviews, Talks, Speeches, Presentations

Amazon.com: El Tercer Pais: San Diego & Tijuana Two Countries, Two Cities, One Community eBook: Malone, Michael S.: Kindle Store

The product of scores of interviews with citizens of San Diego and Tijuana – from everyday working folks to the leading figures – this is the first book ever to look at the two-hundred-year history of the two cities and chart how their relationship has evolved from conflict to interdependence to cooperation. El Tercer Pais combines hard-nosed journalism with insiders’ perspectives to create a celebratory look at how the two cities have gone beyond decades of distrust and wariness to become the m

AMLO’s first year: Mexico’s political, economic, and security trends

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) assumed office in December 2018, promising to bring a fourth revolution to Mexico and to reduce Mexico’s inequality, corruption, and violent crime. Yet a year into his administration, homicides and violent criminality in Mexico have not diminished. While the new government has undertaken new security initiatives and adopted new anti-crime priorities, the brazenness of organized crime has increased. Despite anti-corruption efforts, the country’

Trump's Plan to Label Mexican Drug Cartels as Terrorists Could Backfire in a Big Way

This article originally appeared on VICE US. Within a matter of two months, the Jalisco New Generation Cartel brazenly killed 13 Mexican police officers; the Sinaloa cartel took an entire city hostage after the arrest of one of its leaders; and nine U.S.-citizen women and children were massacred in northern Mexico. Soon after, President Donald Trump proposed a solution: designate the cartels as terrorist organizations. The idea of designating Mexican cartels as terrorist organizations may not

Argentina's elections and its divided Congress with Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne

(Part two of a two-part interview) Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne joins American Ambassadors Live! Podcast host Ambassador G. Philip Hughes for a discussion surrounding Argentina's recent election results, it's divided Congress, and it's economic standing. Ambassador Wayne served as U.S. Ambassador to Mexico and Argentina. This podcast was recorded on November 8, 2019.

Cartel violence, AMLO and USMCA with Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne (Part One)

(Part one of a two-part interview)Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne joins American Ambassadors Live! Podcast host Ambassador G. Philip Hughes in a discussion surrounding recent episodes of cartel violence in Mexico, the USMCA deal, and the development of U.S.-Mexico relations and policy from President Felipe Calderon to Mexico's current president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO). Ambassador Wayne served as U.S. Ambassador to both Mexico and Argentina.

A Conversation with Afghanistan First Lady Rula Ghani

An armchair discussion with the First Lady of Afghanistan Rula Ghani. The conversation will focus on the progress of women and their role in the peace process in Afghanistan. Women have made great economic and social strides in the past 15 years. More than 3.6 million girls are in school and women are now allowed to work, both of which are essential to peace and stability in Afghanistan. However, the work is not over.
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2018 Articles

US, Mexico defy expectations by cooperating on immigration

Mexico and the United States are defying expectations by identifying ways to cooperate on the contentious issues surrounding migration. Since Mexico’s new president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), took office on Dec. 1, U.S. and Mexican officials have hammered out a dual-track approach to tackling the flow and management of migrants heading northward from Central America to Mexico and the United States. One track is a cooperative multi-year strategy designed to help keep potential migrant

Narcos: Transnational Cartels and Border Security

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Argentina, and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. Cooperation between Mexico and the United States regarding transnational crime is vital for the wellbeing of both countries. Both societies pay a high price for the illegal traffic in drugs, money, guns and people that cross our common border. The effective and efficient operation of the border itself is vital for the $1 million a minute of commerce between the

The Time to Build Lasting Bonds Between the US and Mexico is Now

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Argentina, and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. The moment is ripe for the United States to double down on efforts to build a stronger relationship with Mexico for the longer term. Serious short-term problems need to be managed in a way that solidifies cooperation for the years ahead. On Saturday, Dec. 1, Mexico’s new president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO), took office for a six-year term. He also no

The time to build lasting bonds between US and Mexico is now

The moment is ripe for the United States to double down on efforts to build a stronger relationship with Mexico for the longer term. Serious short-term problems need to be managed in a way that solidifies cooperation for the years ahead. On Saturday, Mexico’s new President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), takes office for six years. He will also control both chambers of Mexico’s Congress. AMLO wants to focus on the “transformation” of Mexico, and major domestic reforms are the top priorities

Afghanistan: Praiseworthy Economic Reforms, But Path to Peace Offers the Big Dividend

International donors will convene in Geneva in late November to discuss the social and economic progress made in Afghanistan since the Brussels Donor Conference in 2016. The economic advances made by the Afghan government give donors reasons to be pleased about the results from their pledge to provide $15 billion in assistance through 2020, conditional on the government making progress on the reform program agreed upon in Brussels. In Geneva, donors should praise the reforms made while making cl

US Spotlight Fixed Squarely on AMLO as He Prepares to Take Reins in Mexico

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Argentina, and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. On Dec. 1, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) will be sworn in as Mexico’s president. AMLO’s presidency will have important ramifications for the United States. Through trade, travel, heritage and history, U.S.-Mexico relations touch the daily lives of more American citizens than ties with any other country. The two countries trade over $1 million a minute, ha

Afghanistan Is Making Economic Progress but Needs Peace

International donors will have some good news when they gather to review Afghanistan’s economic progress on November 27–28 in Geneva. While peace prospects , Taliban attacks , and Afghanistan’s unsettled politics will be on everyone’s mind, donors can applaud positive reviews of Afghan performance from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as welcome steps. Afghanistan’s partners should still make clear, however, that continued aid depends on continued reform. Donor governmen

US spotlight fixed squarely on AMLO as he takes reins in Mexico

On Dec. 1, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) will be sworn in as Mexico’s president. AMLO’s presidency will have important ramifications for the United States. Through trade, travel, heritage and history, U.S.-Mexico relations touch the daily lives of more American citizens than ties with any other country. The two countries trade over $1 million a minute, have over $100 billion in mutual investment and share a million border crossings a day. AMLO promises a historic “transformation,” with wi

Central American Caravan Crisis Is a Chance to Forge a Better US Immigration Policy

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Argentina, and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. U.S. President Donald Trump’s demands for neighboring governments to stop the most recent migrant caravan heading to the United States from Central America highlight the pressing need for a regionwide strategy to deal with migration flows. With the current caravan, the government of Mexico is caught between the forceful U.S. requests for action and portions of

Caravan 'crisis' a chance to forge better immigration policy

President Trump Donald John TrumpTrump to fundraise for 3 Republicans running for open seats: report Trump to nominate former Monsanto exec to top Interior position White House aides hadn’t heard of Trump's new tax cut: report MORE’s demands for neighboring governments to stop the most recent migrant caravan heading to the U.S. from Central America highlight the pressing need for a region-wide strategy to deal with migration flows. With the current caravan, the government of Mexico is caught be

If Approved, the New NAFTA Will End the Tyranny of Uncertainty

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Argentina, and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a welcome step. If approved by each country’s legislature, the agreement will dissolve the uncertainty that has hovered over North America’s commercial and production networks for the last two years. A new rules-based agreement can be a major plus for the $1.2 trillion continental market. It is very important no

Special Envoys, ‘Silos’ and Coherent International Policy

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo recently appointed four special envoys to help him manage high priority portfolios regarding Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, and North Korea. His actions are understandable and can yield valuable results, if implemented well. The nomination and confirmation process for senior State Department positions in Washington and overseas has been terribly slow

New NAFTA will end the tyranny of uncertainty if approved

The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a welcome step. If approved by each country’s legislature, the agreement will dissolve the uncertainty that has hovered over North America’s commercial and production networks for the last two years. A new rules-based agreement can be a major plus for the 1.2 trillion dollar continental market. It is very important now, however, to have good assessments of the potential results that will flow from the agreement. While President Trump lauds the po

Special Envoys, “Silos” and Coherent International Policy

Secretary of State Pompeo recently appointed four special envoys to help him manage high priority portfolios regarding Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, and North Korea. His actions are understandable and can yield valuable results, if implemented well.  The nomination and confirmation process for senior State Department positions in Washington and overseas has been terribly slow, yet the world has not slowed.

9 Million Reasons for the US to Get a Trade Deal Done with Canada

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. As U.S. and Canadian officials resumed trade negotiations in Washington earlier this month, it is vital to realize that the United States gains massively from its economic relationship with Canada. Ending the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and moving ahead with only a new U.S.-Mexico trade agreement, as the White House has threatened to do, would damage the Unit

Argentina Deserves US, IMF Support along Rough Road to Recovery

Former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Argentina, and public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. Argentina faces a new economic storm in the midst of extraordinary efforts to restructure its economy and to move against ingrained corruption. Argentina itself must take and implement the hard decisions to succeed on both fronts, but it deserves strong support from its international partners, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the United States

9 million reasons to get a trade deal done with Canada

As U.S. and Canadian officials resume trade negotiations in Washington, it is vital to realize that the United States gains massively from its economic relationship with Canada. Ending the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and moving ahead with only a new U.S.-Mexico trade agreement, as the White House has threatened, would damage the U.S. and Canada. Compared to what is at stake for the United States, the remaining U.S.-Canada trade differences are small and resolvable.

Argentina deserves US, IMF support on rough road to recovery

Argentina faces a new economic storm in the midst of extraordinary efforts to restructure its economy and to move against ingrained corruption. Argentina itself must take and implement the hard decisions to succeed on both fronts, but it deserves strong support from its international partners, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the United States and the investment community, as it strives to achieve these laudable goals.

US-Mexico deal means very little without Canada

The “preliminary agreement in principle” between Mexico and the United States is an important step forward in the effort to agree on a modernized trade agreement in North America. It is important to recognize, however, that the bilateral U.S.-Mexico agreement is not a good substitute for a trilateral agreement that brings in Canada, America’s largest trading partner. Much work lies ahead to agree upon a new North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that will significantly benefit the United

Trump's New Trade Agreement: What's In It?

On August 27, US President Donald J. Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced an initial agreement on a new bilateral trade relationship . The negotiations were initially intended to be a start for wider conversations on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), including the third treaty partner, Canada. During the announcement, however, Trump implied that he may choose to negotiate bilaterally with Canada instead of reviving the tripartite agreement.
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2018 Interviews, Speeches and Presentations

December 2018: Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne | Season 2018 Episode 12 | Suncoast Business Forum

Our trade agreement with Mexico and Canada, America's biggest trading partners, was just torn up and rewritten. Tariffs on imports from China and other countries are in affect and could go higher. Is the New World Order changing? And if so, where does the U.S. fit in? Former U.S. Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne will be our special guest to give an inside perspective on America's role. Ran 15 times, from December 2018 through March 2019.

Between Free Trade and 'America First': Analyzing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

After a two-year period of uncertainty on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the United States Mexico and Canada reached a new deal on the U.S. self-imposed deadline of September 30. The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is now pending approval from each country’s legislature. If approved, what potential results will come from the agreement? The Wilson Center’s Canada and Mexico Institutes hosted a discussion on the beginning of a new era in North America’s trade

A Modernized NAFTA

The new trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico “modernizes” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and lifts a cloud of uncertainty that has lingered over the past several months, according to Earl Anthony Wayne, a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program.In negotiations that went down to the wire, Canada agreed on September 30 to join the United States and Mexico in a revised version of NAFTA.

Telephone Briefing "The U.S.-Mexico Trade Deal: Is This the End of NAFTA?"

Yesterday, after more than a year of negotiations, the United States and Mexico announced a trade deal that resolves several contested bilateral issues. However, this tentative deal does not include Canada, which will join in negotiations this week. The deal has implications for jobs, manufacturing, and competitiveness across the continent. What does it mean for North American trade? What is the likelihood that the three countries will reach a trilateral trade agreement? What impact will this have on U.S.-Mexico relations? Senior Wilson Center experts discussed the implications of the U.S.-Mexico trade deal and what the next steps entail in this telephone briefing.
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2017 Artices

It's in America's National Interest to Stay in NAFTA

President Trump’s new national security strategy stresses the importance of promoting America’s prosperity and security. It highlights rivalry and competition with China and Russia and underscores the importance of strengthening international alliances where partners shoulder their responsibilities. Our North American neighbors, Mexico and Canada, should be priority partners under President Donald Trump’s new strategy for enhancing U.S. security and prosperity. Both are willing and effective pa

Avoid an American “Brexit” with NAFTA

The United States, Mexico, and Canada are in the midst of renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which came into force in 1994. Millions of jobs, massive cross-border production networks, and broader cooperation on fighting transnational crime are at stake. Today, trade among the three countries has grown almost four times, supporting up to 14 million U.S. jobs and generating $1.3 trillion of commerce each year. The security, political, and economic costs and consequence

Beyond Trade: The Costs and Consequences of Exiting NAFTA

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is a free trade agreement signed by Canada, Mexico and the United States in 1993 and came into force on January 1st, 1994.  After more than 23 years of successful economic cooperation, supporting 14 million U.S. jobs and generating $1.2 trillion of commerce each year, the trade agreement is now being renegotiated and faces very tough challenges as the U.S. administration is pursuing major changes, not just a modernization.

Ditching NAFTA not in America's best interests

Texas has the most to lose of any U.S. state if NAFTA talks go wrong. It has a great deal to gain if the talks to modernize NAFTA go well. Now that the negotiations have slowed over controversial U.S. proposals, Texans and their elected federal and state representatives should be making very clear to the Trump administration team overseeing the NAFTA negotiations that they should do no harm to the massive Texas-Mexico trade relationship, and rather focus on creating new opportunities. The contr

Ditching NAFTA not in America's best interests

Texas has the most to lose of any U.S. state if NAFTA talks go wrong. It has a great deal to gain if the talks to modernize NAFTA go well. Now that the negotiations have slowed over controversial U.S. proposals, Texans and their elected federal and state representatives should be making very clear to the Trump administration team overseeing the NAFTA negotiations that they should do no harm to the massive Texas-Mexico trade relationship, and rather focus on creating new opportunities.

The New Afghanistan Policy Is Set. The Question Is How to Implement It.

The focus now should be on the implementation of the new U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and the region. Commentators debate the pros and cons of the approach, but it is now U.S. policy. It requires careful coordination and integration of the tools of American power—military, diplomatic, economic and development—to move toward its objective: a negotiated Afghan political settlement. The policy’s specifics must now be defined and executed.

North America’s Agenda for 2017 and Beyond

Continental supply chains that link Canada, the United States and Mexico mean that much of what is produced in each country has content from its neighbors. For example, a CRV SUV built in Jalisco, Mexico, has inputs of 70% from the United States and Canada. To establish these supply and production chains, private firms in all three countries have invested in their neighbors: U.S. companies have invested about 386 billion dollars in Canada and 108 billion dollars in Mexico.

Many of Trump's NAFTA goals aren't new — they're from the TPP

The United States Trade Representative (USTR) announced a set of U.S. trade objectives for a modernized North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on Monday. The objectives seem to offer a bit to everyone, trade skeptics and trade advocates alike. To do so, they use strong yet vague rhetoric on protectionists’ priorities, like the trade deficit, while promising to maintain and expand market access for U.S. farmers, manufacturers and the broader business community.

The US and Mexico: Education and Mutual Understanding

Last week, officials from the U.S. and Mexico revitalized their commitment to fight cross-border smuggling of drugs, arms and money. U.S. officials recognized America’s demand for drugs as “the magnet” that feeds drug smuggling, and Mexico committed to tackle jointly the elements of the cartels’ business model. While illegal immigration and drugs dominate much of the public discourse around U.S.-Mexico relations, the partnership between these countries is vital and dynamic in many other ways.
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2017 Interviews, Speeches and Presentations

Beyond Trade: The Costs and Consequences of Exiting NAFTA

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is a free trade agreement signed by Canada, Mexico and the United States in 1993 and came into force on January 1st, 1994.  After more than 23 years of successful economic cooperation, supporting 14 million U.S. jobs and generating $1.2 trillion of commerce each year, the trade agreement is now being renegotiated and faces very tough challenges as the U.S. administration is pursuing major changes, not just a modernization.

Private Sector Engagement in Afghanistan

Private sector development in Afghanistan is a crucial topic for U.S engagement in the region. Between 2002 and 2010, about 57 billion US dollars of official development assistance (ODA) was disbursed to Afghanistan for purposes of reconstruction and development. Less than five percent of the ODA has gone towards private sector development in Afghanistan, with most of the money allocated to infrastructure, agriculture and rural development, and governance.

Tackling North America’s Workforce Challenges, NASCO Conference, Dallas, Texas

As North America strengthens its global competitive advantage in advanced manufacturing and logistics, we are facing significant and growing labor market shortfalls. We share a common challenge, and also a common opportunity, to “up-skill” and grow our next generation of front-line manufacturing and logistics workers by streamlining and harmonizing our approach to standards and training, and to bring maximum value to workforce credentials.

Presentation to the U.S.-Mexico Border Mayors Association – Binational Summit, San Diego, CA

NAFTA 2.0 is a big opportunity for San Diego and the entire U.S.-Mexico border region. From the perspective of the cities and states along the U.S.-Mexico border there are two big objectives: first, do no harm to the massive trade, production and investment networks that support over a million U.S. jobs in the border states; and second, assure that NAFTA 2.0 creates new opportunities for economic growth, more fluid commercial border flows, and steps that will make cross-border production more competitive internationally.

Discussion Focuses on the Future of Afghanistan at SAIS Johns Hopkins University

Analysts and former ambassadors talked about possible U.S. policy and strategy toward Afghanistan in the upcoming Trump administration. They assessed the current situation in the region, and laid out what they thought were key priorities for the incoming administration to pursue in order to achieve further security, stability and autonomy for Afghanistan’s government and people. Analysts and former ambassadors talked about possible U.S. policy and strategy toward Afghanistan in the upcoming Tru

2016 Articles

Shaping the New National Security Council

Many around the world and across the United States are watching with rapt attention reports about President-elect Trump’s potential national security team. His choices will be vital in shaping America’s international role for the years ahead. After forty years as U.S. diplomat, having worked through presidential transitions, I am watching from the outside, teaching about foreign policy decision-making at Hamilton College this semester.

Why the Brussels Donor Conference Should Recommit to Afghanistan

This week, the European Union and the Afghan government will co-host the third in a series of conferences in Brussels that will convene Afghanistan’s partners to discuss future foreign assistance commitments. At the 2012 Conference in Tokyo seventy international donors promised to mobilize $16 billion for Afghanistan in total foreign assistance over the subsequent four years, with the United States expected to cover about half of the amount.

The business community is the driving force behind North America’s economic strength

On June 29, President Obama, Prime Minister Trudeau, and President Peña Nieto will meet in Ottawa for a North American Leaders Summit (NALS). While often ignored or criticized, America’s relations with Canada and Mexico touch the daily lives of more U.S. citizens than any other relationships in the world.  Positive, productive relations among neighbors will help generate the well-being and economic growth our citizens seek.

North America Must Compete Globally

Contrary to campaign rhetoric, the integration of North America over the past quarter century has successfully grown the continental economy and enabled it to compete in global markets. And, in North America this has been done without the centralized institutions that UK voters just rejected. The June 29 North American Leaders' Summit in Ottawa offers an opportunity to launch even smarter collaboration across Canada, Mexico, and the United States that respects the sovereignty of each partner.

North America Must Compete Globally

Contrary to campaign rhetoric, the integration of North America over the past quarter century has successfully grown the continental economy and enabled it to compete in global markets. And, in North America this has been done without the centralized institutions that UK voters just rejected. The June 29 North American Leaders’ Summit in Ottawa offers an opportunity to launch even smarter collaboration across Canada, Mexico, and the United States that respects the sovereignty of each partner.

Three Amigos, five important results for Trudeau, Obama and Peña Nieto

Michael Kergin is a former Canadian ambassador to the U.S.; Earl Anthony Wayne is a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and Arturo Sarukhan is former Mexican ambassador to the U.S. This week's North American Leaders' Summit (NALS) in Ottawa is the first time Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, President Barack Obama and President Enrique Peña Nieto will discuss issues affecting the continent together.

North American Leaders Must Not Surrender to Nativism

Relations among North America’s three big neighbors are much more important to their citizens’ self-interest than the great majority of those citizens realize. The U.S. media’s focus on Mexico is too often negative, while Canada frequently gets neglected. The political campaign season in the United States has magnified negative statements about North American ties by candidates building on stereotypes and false premises.

Toward A Cleaner And Leaner Energy Future For North America

Energy and Environment will be key topics when the leaders of North America gather for a Summit in Canada on June 29.  Because of a closer orientation among the three governments, the leaders of Canada, Mexico and the United States have a real opportunity to think about cooperation across our continent in a new way.  President Obama, Prime Minister Trudeau and President Peña Nieto can enunciate a shared strategic vision of energy security and environmental protection.
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2011-2015 Op-Eds and other items published while Wayne served as U.S. Ambassador to Mexico

Juntos Contra la Trata de Personas

Durante mis 40 años como diplomático he tenido el privilegio de descubrir tanto los mejores como los peores aspectos de países alrededor del mundo, incluido el mío. Uno de los temas más difíciles que he trabajado en múltiples naciones ha sido el aumento de la trata de personas. En mis casi cuatro años como embajador en México me he percatado agudamente de cómo el tráfico de personas es una plaga en este país y en nuestra región, América del Norte, como un todo.

Trabajar en innovación es la nueva fase de las relaciones de México y EU

El embajador de Estados Unidos en México señala que hay que ir más allá de los intercambios comerciales y de inversión. Anthony Wayne, representante en México del gobierno de Estados Unidos, anunciará esta semana la firma de un Memorándum de Entendimiento entre las dos naciones con objeto de establecer programas de intercambio de pasantías para que mexicanos puedan acudir por algunas semanas a Estados Unidos y viceversa...

Una prensa libre, vital para la democracia

El sábado 3 de mayo celebramos el Día Mundial de la Libertad de Prensa, una ocasión para que los países conmemoren los principios fundamentales de este derecho, evalúen su estado a escala mundial, defiendan a los medios de los ataques contra su independencia y rindan tributo a los periodistas que han perdido sus vidas en la línea del deber. http://www.milenio.com/opinion/anthony-wayne/columna-anthony-wayne/una-prensa-libre-vital-para-la-democracia

Contra la trata, primero identificar a las víctimas

La trata de personas debe preocupar a cada individuo, porque es la degradación de nuestra humanidad común. Debe preocupar a cada comunidad porque desgarra el tejido social. Debe preocupar a cada empresa porque distorsiona los mercados. Debe preocupar a cada nación porque pone en peligro la salud pública y alimenta la violencia y el crimen organizado. Estoy hablando de la injusticia, de la brutalidad de la trata de personas, a la que debe llamarse por su verdadero nombre: esclavitud moderna .

El Universal - Opinion - Celebrando los avances en derechos humanos

El Día Internacional de los Derechos Humanos, que celebramos cada 10 de diciembre, conmemora la adopción de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos por la Asamblea General de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas en 1948. Al adoptar la declaración, Estados Unidos, México y gobiernos alrededor del mundo reconocieron que los seres humanos son, por virtud de su nacimiento, investidos con ciertos derechos inalienables, y que éstos sirven como “fundamentos de la libertad, la justicia y la paz alrededor del mundo".

Día Mundial de Lucha contra el Sida

Alrededor del mundo, la atención de la gente se ha volcado sobre México por la toma de posesión de otro presidente libremente electo, Enrique Peña Nieto. Pero cada año, el 1º de diciembre también conmemoramos el Día Mundial de la Lucha contra el Sida (síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida), y reflexionamos sobre las vidas perdidas a causa de este padecimiento. Es una oportunidad de rendir tributo a los 34 millones de personas que viven con VIH (virus de inmunodeficiencia humana) en todo el mundo. Hoy celebramos las vidas que se han salvado y que han mejorado, y volvemos a comprometernos con la lucha contra el Sida...

Combatir la esclavitud moderna: la trata de personas

El 22 de septiembre de 1862, el presidente Abraham Lincoln anunció la Proclamación de Emancipación, que liberó a casi cuatro millones de hombres, mujeres y niños de las cadenas de la esclavitud y comprometió a Estados Unidos a terminar con este delito en toda la nación. Al conmemorar el 150 aniversario de este gran paso en la promoción de derechos humanos en Estados Unidos; países alrededor del mundo, incluyendo Estados Unidos, continúan marcados por servidumbre involuntaria y llevan el yugo de los mitos que la apoyan. Para erradicar esta moderna aflicción a la sociedad debemos de reconocer estos mitos y reemplazarlos con la verdad...
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1996-2009 Articles, interviews and other public references.

During his time in the U.S. Foreign Service, Earl Anthony Wayne published a number of articles and spoke at a number of conferences and seminars as well as testifying before the U.S. Congress. 

Transatlantic Cooperation: New Strategies for New Issues

Burros, William, and University of Pittsburgh. Center for West European Studies. Global Security Beyond 2000: Global Population Growth, Environmental Degradation, Migration, And Transnational Organized Crime : November 2-3, 1995, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA : Conference Report. Pittsburgh, PA: Center for West European Studies, University of Pittsburgh, 1996.

1987-1989 Articles published in The Christian Science Monitor

Mr. Wayne was the National Security Correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor based in Washington, D.C. from summer of 1987 through summer of 1989.  This is a listing of the articles he authored.

1977-78 Articles on China

While working on Chinese Affairs at the Department of State, Wayne published two scholarly articles.

Spring, 1978  "The Politics of Re-staffing China's Provinces: 1976-77," Contemporary China. Volume II Number 1

April, 1977    "China and the Third World," Contemporary China. Volume 1 Number 7

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